STEINE

April 11, 2012 § Leave a comment

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STEINE. An exhibition curated by Sara Barnes and Andrew Patrizio at the Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum der Charité. 27 January – 23 September 2012

Ephemeral islands, petrified raindrops, a collection of body stones, a shared birthday with a volcano. Certain geological processes evoke a more personal response to the idea of geological time. What is the duration of daily life, the life span of a volcano, your own time floating around on tectonic plates? What does 300,000,000 years actually mean? If a body stone is a miniature landmass, how do we locate it on the map? If a new landmass can be born, should we mark its birth and death? As  astronauts frequently form body stones in space, are they discovering internal planets en-route? How do we understand the deep geology of Earth or the Solar System or, indeed, the historical record of museum objects?  We are all autobiographical trace fossils, a record of an action no matter whether animal, vegetable, mineral or somewhere in between.

Created by Glasgow-based artist Ilana Halperin and inspired by the collections at the Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum, the exhibition Steine is a unique contribution to an enigmatic topic: a creative exploration of the intersections between body stones and geology. Steine juxtaposes the artist’s work with medical and geological materials, forming a series of poetic connections between the organic and inorganic, across time and space.

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